Category Archives: History in Culture

June Tabor – Freedom and Rain

The folk boom of the sixties carried on into the seventies, but became a lot more commercial in the process.  The three big female folk stars in the UK were Sandy Denny, Maddy Prior and June Tabor.  Of the three I think most people would agree that the one with the best voice was June Tabor.  She also had a seriousness of purpose and a sort of honesty.  Whereas Sandy Denny worked with Fairport Convention and  Maddy Prior fronted Steel Eye Span, June Tabor always seemed more concerned with expressing herself and never really went in for the compromises attendant on being part of a group.  Consequently she was the darling of the critics and didn’t sell that many records. Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under History in Culture

Leonard Cohen Live At London

 

“Nobody listens to me round here.  I feel like a Leonard Cohen record.” – Neil, The Young Ones

Faced with a time consuming and not particularly brain consuming task at my computer the other day, I threw out a request to my Twitter chums.  I’d listen to the first album somebody suggested.  The suggestion that came back was Leonard Cohen Live At London. Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under History in Culture

Hamlet by Johnny Hallyday – the worst thing ever

Johnny Hallyday needs no introduction to the French speaking world, but despite a career that is now over fifty years old you can still not assume that anglophones have even heard of him.  Those that have tend to be a bit bemused.  Back in the early sixties Johnny Hallyday made the momentous decision to sing songs in the style of Elvis Presley but in French.  It was a sensation, and he has never looked back.  He rapidly became a huge star in France and has remained one ever since.  Only a few years ago a concert in Paris had half a million people trying to get tickets.  In the days when these things mattered, his records sold in the millions.  In pure numerical terms his sales make him one of the major figures of the rock world.  When you consider that his success is limited geographically to France, Belgium and parts of Switzerland and Canada it is even more remarkable. Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under 20th Century, History in Culture

Women Bishops – Not in the Church of England

Women Bishops

Women Bishops? Not in the Church of England

I was shocked to hear the news that women will not be allowed to become bishops in the Church of England.  I had no idea that they were banned in the first place.  I had thought that when they were allowed to join the clergy in the first place, that opened up the whole hierarchy.  Oh well, it is only the C of E.  It is not as if it is anything that important.  In fact, I should have realised that if there was a crazy option to take on the subject of gender, the established church was likely to take it.

I only have to look at some of the curious arrangements in the churches in the little bit of the patchwork of the English countryside where I happen to live.   The local Catholic priest lives with his wife.  He can only do that on the basis of a special dispensation from the Pope.  He used to be an Anglican vicar who went over to the Catholics over the issue of women priests.  The Catholics were flexible enough to allow married ex-Anglican clergy to sign up even if they were married.  Not too far away a former Catholic priest has turned Anglican.  He was obliged to make the switch when he fell in love and got married.  Not all local clergy have such problems I should point out.  The previous vicar in the Church nearest to me was a confirmed bachelor, who was happy to make do with the companionship of a good friend who lived in with him.  So that was alright. Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under History in Culture

The Fry Chronicles

“If a thing can be said in ten words, I may be relied upon to take a hundred to say it. I ought to apologize for that. I ought to prune, pare and extirpate excess growth, but I will not. I like words – strike that, I love words.” – The Fry Chronicles

 

A celebrity autobiography can be the story of the persons life, with a narrative arc leading to their final success.  Or it can be an exploration of what makes the person tick.  Or it can be an amusing collection of anecdotes about the famous.  Or if you are Stephen Fry with a love of words and seemingly endless stock of clever turns of phrase, you can mix all three.  The result, the Fry Chronicles, is like a big pile of sweets – the sort some people do for Christmas with lots of different treats in a big bowl.  And as it happens, big piles of sweets feature prominently in the early chapters as we hear in huge detail just how addicted the young Fry was to sugar in all its forms and just how much trouble that got him into. Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under History in Culture

Telstar by the Tornados

Telstar – the satellite (thanks to Wikipedia)

I was 3 when Telstar came out, so I probably don’t remember it when it was actually a hit record. But I heard it often enough as a small boy that it formed part of my experience of growing up.  It was always my favourite.  It was just so space age. This was what the future was going to be about.  Rockets and music without any singing.  I just loved it all so much.  I acquired then and have never lost a profound belief that the future is going to be better, people are going to sort things out and that technological progress is a good thing.   Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under History in Culture

Nymphs and their Ways – Covent Garden’s Acis and Galatea by Handel

Acis and Galatea

I still find it slightly astonishing that entire operas can be posted on YouTube.  But there they are, and as far as I can tell they are there with the blessing of the producers.  If they objected YouTube would have taken them down straight away.  I suppose the advertising revenue that they generate is a bonus, though I can’t imagine it amounts to very much.  Still the economics of opera has never made any more sense than the plots. But it does mean that what used to be the ultimate in elitist entertainment is now available for anyone. In the comfort of their own home.  Or you can even watch opera on your phone while wandering about.  I wonder if this ready supply will entice people who might not otherwise have considered it to give it a go?  I’d like to think so.
Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under History in Culture

Herman the German – A long forgotten English Hero

Herman

One of the fifteen decisive battles of history identified by Edward Creasy was the battle in the Teutoburg Forest where the Roman General Varus lost three legions almost to a man to a huge ambush by the German tribesmen.  We have a pretty good account of the engagement from Tacitus and Creasy writes it up superbly to make it into a great piece of writing.  It is hard to dispute that this is indeed a decisive battle since it prevented the Romans from establishing a frontier much further east which would have made the empire much deeper and would have reduced the length of the frontier that needed to be defended considerably.  Had they succeeded the empire might well have lasted a lot longer. Continue reading

5 Comments

Filed under History in Culture

Voodoo Histories: How Conspiracy Theory Has Shaped Modern History by David Aaronovitch

The biggest problem with studying history is remembering that the people taking part in it didn’t know what was going to happen next.  And there is another problem as well – they often didn’t know accurately what had happened before either.  People’s motivations are often therefore hard to fathom.  And the existence of conspiracy theories makes it even harder.  It is in the nature of conspiracy theories that they tend to be very specific to particular times and are often completely forgotten about later.  Take for example the Protocols of the Elders of  Zion. Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under History in Culture

The Parable of Galileo

I have become a bit embarrassed by the amount of interest my post about the trial of Galileo has generated.  It was a very quick and not particularly thought out piece that I just knocked out in half an hour or so in response to a Pious Fabrication’s video.   But it has been the most read post on my blog all week.  Comments made on it were rather better written and much more informed than my actual post.  That was humbling. But it has got me thinking about why the story of Galileo continues to resonate, especially given that the event itself was a bit confused to say the least.   I think it’s because it has gone beyond an historical event and has turned into a parable. Continue reading

Leave a Comment

Filed under History in Culture